Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. The coronavirus has caused an unprecedented shift of people working, learning and socializing from inside their homes, and Zoom has been there to take advantage. The group conferencing app is connecting people from all over the world, but with its increased popularity -- it went from 10 million meetings in December to 200 million last month -- there has come a new level of scrutiny. After some embarrassing security and privacy revelations and the rise of "zoombombing," CEO Eric S. Yuan said the company will dedicate all of its engineering resources to fixing its "biggest trust, safety and privacy issues." Will that be enough to keep its momentum going? Only time will tell, but until then, at least take some basic steps to keep "party crashers" out of your Zoom chats. -- Richard Up against AMD. Intel and NVIDIA have new hardware for your next laptop Intel has crossed the 5GHz barrier with its new notebook CPUs, and you'll get such speeds from six- and eight-core i7 processors, not just the fully specced i9 model. Intel stepped up its fight against AMD's new 4000 series Ryzen mobile processors, which also offer up to eight cores, but with a lower 4.4GHz maximum clock speed. AMD, however, is using a refined 7nm architecture, which makes them more power efficient. Oh, and AMD's latest chips also include up to eight cores of Radeon Vega graphics, which are far more capable than Intel's aging UHD graphics. That said, these processors are meant to go with a dedicated GPU, so it's a different thing. Fortunately, then, NVIDIA's Super iterations of its RTX cards are now getting laptop versions, with the most powerful being the flagship RTX 2080 Super Max-Q. The company has included some new Max-Q features that should boost performance and power efficiency significantly on all the Max-Q GPUs, but only on new 2020 laptops. Naturally, all this news lands alongside new laptop reveals from Razer, Gigabyte and ASUS and Lenovo -- so it's worth browsing around if you're planning to pick up a powerful gaming PC in the next six months.

Hey, good morning! You look fabulous.

The coronavirus has caused an unprecedented shift of people working, learning and socializing from inside their homes, and Zoom has been there to take advantage. The group conferencing app is connecting people from all over the world, but with its increased popularity — it went from 10 million meetings in December to 200 million last month — there has come a new level of scrutiny.

After some embarrassing security and privacy revelations and the rise of “zoombombing,” CEO Eric S. Yuan said the company will dedicate all of its engineering resources to fixing its “biggest trust, safety and privacy issues.” Will that be enough to keep its momentum going? Only time will tell, but until then, at least take some basic steps to keep “party crashers” out of your Zoom chats.

— Richard

Up against AMD.
Intel and NVIDIA have new hardware for your next laptop

Intel has crossed the 5GHz barrier with its new notebook CPUs, and you’ll get such speeds from six- and eight-core i7 processors, not just the fully specced i9 model. Intel stepped up its fight against AMD’s new 4000 series Ryzen mobile processors, which also offer up to eight cores, but with a lower 4.4GHz maximum clock speed. AMD, however, is using a refined 7nm architecture, which makes them more power efficient. Oh, and AMD’s latest chips also include up to eight cores of Radeon Vega graphics, which are far more capable than Intel’s aging UHD graphics. That said, these processors are meant to go with a dedicated GPU, so it’s a different thing.

Fortunately, then, NVIDIA’s Super iterations of its RTX cards are now getting laptop versions, with the most powerful being the flagship RTX 2080 Super Max-Q. The company has included some new Max-Q features that should boost performance and power efficiency significantly on all the Max-Q GPUs, but only on new 2020 laptops. Naturally, all this news lands alongside new laptop reveals from Razer, Gigabyte and ASUS and Lenovo — so it’s worth browsing around if you’re planning to pick up a powerful gaming PC in the next six months.